5 Ways to Measure the Efficacy of Your Safety Protocols

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Video Transcript
*This webinar was transcribed by Artificial intelligence software software and may not accurately transcribe all the content of this webinar. Please watch the video to get the most accurate description.

S. Gonzalez: 
Welcome everyone and thank you for joining today’s webinars hosted by Raptor technology. I’m Shannon Gonzalez with Raptor and I will be facilitating today’s presentation in discussion. This webinar of the raptor school safety series is entitled five ways measure the efficacy of your safety protocols. In this Webinar, Dr Jaclyn, Schildkraut, will share effective ways to proactively evaluate your safety protocols and identify key questions to ask for self-assessment of security products only. Doctor, she’ll crowd the presentations. We will hear briefly from Clayton Dorsett regional director here at raptors who will provide us with a quick overview of the raptors solutions available to support your school safety initiatives and then we’ll move into the life you and date. So as you have questions, please feel free to enter them into the question box at any time. Also, you will receive a copy of the recording of this webinar in your email following the presentation just in case you’d like to refer back to it.

S. Gonzalez: 
I’m thrilled now to introduce our guests. Speaker Dr. Schildkraut is an associate professor of criminal justice. At State University of New York at Oswego and then internationally recognized expert on the topics of school safety and mass shooting. She has authored several books on the topic including her most recently released title Columbine 20 years later and beyond lessons from tragedy that explores how safety and security pertaining to mass shootings has changed since April 20th, 1999 her work has also been featured in numerous other articles and books and has been heavily cited by media outlets including CBS, NBC News, Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, vox, in the Huffington post, and others, a former residents of the Parkland area. Jacqueline now works with school districts to help ensure that students, faculty and staff are receiving enough are receiving emergency preparedness training to help improve school safety. Dr. Schildkraut thank you so much for joining us today.

Dr. Schildkraut:
Thank you so much for having me. I’m really excited to talk about what is a very important topic and I thank you to everybody who has logged in and joined us today. And I think where we can begin is the fact that we’re all brought here by one important goal and that is school safety. We want to ensure that our students, our colleagues and our employees are all the safest they can be in our buildings. And if we think about how the, um, conversation about school safety has unfolded, we can pinpoint three pretty considerable or significant markers along this narrative. The first, of course being the Columbine high school shooting back in 1999, of course a couple of months ago, we celebrated or commemorated rather the 20th anniversary of that event, and I think when we think back to 1999, there were a lot of questions raised by this particular event.

Dr. Schildkraut: 
It was the first time that we saw something like this unfold, live on television. And accordingly it brought up a lot of questions. Like, what do we do if this happens in our own community? How do we respond to a similar tragedy? What can we do to prevent this tragedy, um, in half from happening in our own community. And so where we really saw in the aftermath of Columbine was this proliferation of things like emergency preparedness training or active shooter training. We saw changes to building security, trying to put more school resource officers into buildings, just ways in which we can improve the general safety, um, in case one of these events ever was to happen again. If we fast forward to 2012 then there was the shooting in Sandy Hook in Newtown, Connecticut at the elementary school. And what Sandy Hook really highlighted was that these types of events can really happen even in areas where people are doing things correctly.

Dr. Schildkraut: 
Um, in many ways the school was a model for safety. The Principal Don Hodge Sprung, uh, made sure that the school regularly practice their active shooter drills, that they knew what to do, not only the faculty and staff, but also the students. And even in light of that, there was a significant death toll and loss on that particular day. And so in the aftermath of Sandy Hook, what we really saw was again, this refocusing and this re emphasis on training. Um, really kind of making sure that people understood what they were supposed to do. We saw people, uh, you know, a lot of companies sort of spring up to be able to offer different types of training and really change how we prepared within our school buildings for a similar type of event. The third pretty significant marker that we see along this pathway is last year shooting at Marjorie Stoneman Douglas high school in Parkland, Florida.

Dr. Schildkraut: 
And where while there were a number of issues highlighted in the aftermath of the shooting in part related to the perpetrator but also in part related to training or lack thereof that had been received by students in particular, what we really saw after a Parkland was this proliferation of the school securities and safety product market. Um, it’s really not uncommon today to walk into a place like office depot or office Max or staples and see in the school supply section things like bulletproof backpack selling for $179 and upwards. And so what we really saw was a proliferation of products, not necessarily as much of a conversation about training per se. Um, but definitely an introduction of more devices, products, um, and technologies that could be used by students, faculty, staff, and buildings alike to keep occupants safe in the event of an emergency. And of course, we know that the product market is quite extensive and it can, you know, there’s many different choices out there.

Dr. Schildkraut: 
Um, as I mentioned, of course there’s bulletproof backpacks, there’s whiteboards, there’s, um, different security devices that can be used to lock doors or, you know, visitor management systems, of course, like raptor technologies. There’s all different choices out there. And so the question that we’re really gonna focus on today is how do we navigate all of these different choices? How do we make the choice that’s best for our needs, our building, our community members? Is it possible to navigate all of these different choices? And if so, how can we do that most effectively? In order to be able to do that, we have to start by acknowledging what’s missing. And in that respect, um, something that, you know, from an academic standpoint is concerning is the fact that we are missing a lot of evidence base,, information. So for instance, there’s a lot of devices or programs or protocols out there that sound really good but don’t have any evidence to support whether or not they’re going to be effective for their intended goal.

Dr. Schildkraut:
So for instance, if we were to think back to the bulletproof backpack for a moment, while the idea is generally good and we understand where it was born, out of a bigger concern is the fact that of course we know in order for it to be effective, it has to be worn. And students today aren’t wearing their backpacks all day, every day. So there isn’t necessarily that evidence to suggest that it would meet its intended goals. So when we think about these missing pieces, we really want to figure out how we can plug those holes in order to make the best informed decision that we can. And of course, it’s not just bulletproof backpacks that don’t have any evidence, um, behind them to support their efficacy one way or another. Um, what I found particularly interesting while researching for the Columbine book is that every year there are millions of dollars being spent by the Department of Justice and the community oriented policing office, uh, for school resource officers.

Dr. Schildkraut: 
And there’s not been any studies conducted since 1999 the year of Columbine, uh, as to whether or not they meet the intended goal of reducing crime in schools. Now, of course, we know that school resource officers wear many different hats. We know that they not only helped to reduce campus crime and behavioral issues, but they’re also there to act as mentors to students to act as points of information or points of contact when there are concerns about individuals or danger on campus. So they do serve a lot of different functions that could very easily be measured in terms of efficacy, but hasn’t been in a really long time. No, I don’t want to here and suggest that there’s nothing that works. Um, you know, one thing that we know that does have evidence behind it, our door locks. We know from looking at all of the incidents of mass violence on campus that nobody has ever been killed behind a door lock because a door lock failed.

Dr. Schildkraut: 
On the same token, there’s only been three instances where anybody has been harmed behind the door lock period. So in that respect, we know that this is an evidence based practice that should be used in every school building. So to kind of, you know, bring that full circle, we know that there are a lot of good ideas that are out there and we know that a lot of these are bore out of concern for safety as as they rightfully should be. But just because they sound like they’re a good idea doesn’t necessarily mean that they are a good idea. And so we really want to focus today on sort of flushing out how we identify whether or not something is going to meet our needs and is going to achieve our goals. And it’s important to start in that mindset with the fact that there is not a one size fits all solution.

Dr. Schildkraut: 
I personally teach on a college campus and every one of our buildings is different. And even within each building differ, the rooms are different. So in one of my classes I will teach in a room that has eight doors that all open outwards stadium seating, much like what you’re seeing in the picture here. Um, and you know, not really any way for me to walk or to secure the doors that presents very different challenges than when I’m in another building or in another room that only has one door. So we really want to be mindful of the fact that we’re not going to find any one solution that’s going to fit everybody. And so an important starting place in this conversation is really about identifying the individual goals and needs of buildings, of rooms of these different levels and layers that we face or we see within our school districts.

Dr. Schildkraut: 
Um, cause they’re all going to have very different needs. And so it’s really important to really be mindful of finding the best fit and that’s going to look different for everybody. So I really suggest having sitting down and having those brainstorming conversations to identify goals and needs and really making those, the focal point of any, um, any evaluation plan or any decisions that are going to be made. So really it’s about setting those goals and always kind of referring back to them in each step of the process that we’re going to talk about. One thing that I want to stress is really important is that we don’t want to only plan for the worst. And you know, certainly school safety gets very highlighted in the aftermath of events like Parkland. And we do know, of course, that schools today remain one of the, if not the safest places that students can be.

Dr. Schildkraut:
But of course, we do know that there are challenges and I would encourage everybody I’m, you know, certainly speaking from a personal perspective, not to adopt the mindset of it could never happen here. Um, I think myself and many people in the community that I grew up in, which was the Parkland area, we’re certainly very guilty of saying that. And I think if anything highlighted that there’s no community that is immune, it would be the parkland shooting of last year. Um, the city had recently been named the safest place in the United States. Um, the schools, you know, are, we’re extremely safe. It’s an area we never had to worry about anything in. The worst thing we did was, you know, sneak out of our houses and ride our bikes to McDonald’s when we were kids. But I think it’s really important to underscore that it really can happen anywhere.

Dr. Schildkraut: 
And so, you know, one of the things that I always tell people is it’s very important that you’re prepared and that you have the tools and the resources because it’s better to not have to need them, or excuse me, it’s better to have them and not need them than it is to need them and not have them. And that’s also something, unfortunately, that the parkland shooting highlighted. So when we think about this, you know, we want to be mindful that we’re not immune to any one type of violence or behavioral issue or problem in our schools, but we also don’t want to get so focused on something as rare as a mass shooting because we really want to think about our every day our students come to school and they face a number of different challenges. Um, you know, whether it’s stuff that they’re bringing in from home or issues that they’re facing with in school, whether that’s you know, challenges that they have with other students or even just those that they face within themselves.

Dr. Schildkraut: 
And so it’s really important that we’re being mindful of planning for that every day and keeping in focus the bigger picture. It’s really important that we think about all of the different challenges that our school buildings and our at our school communities can face and not getting so focused in on the smaller details or the less likely scenarios. Because the reality is, is that if we prepare for everything, then we have those added layers of protection. A couple of years ago, I was actually at the briefings, which is a school safety symposium that’s put on by the, I love you guys foundation who are a partner with raptor technologies. And one of the presenters was John McDonald, who is the executive director of safety and security for Jefferson County public schools, which is where, um, Columbine is. And he said something that really stuck with me and that was that not every threat is a school shooting, but every requires us to do our very best on our very worst day.

Dr. Schildkraut:
And so I think if we adopt our mindset to think that, you know, not every situation is going to be at the Parkland, but we have to be prepared for everything. Then we’re focusing on the bigger picture. And in doing so we prepare for those rare events. And also in preparing for those rare events, we address the everyday issues. So it’s sort of this reciprocal relationship that we’re looking at. One of the most important things is to evaluate the different options. And again, doing this constant comparison back to the goals and the needs of the district. And the individual schools because there are a lot of options out there and the only way that you’re going to be able to identify what is the best one is to is through evaluation. And of course this becomes a bit more challenging given the fact that there isn’t necessarily this plethora of evidence that is readily available to say this product meets its intended goals.

Dr. Schildkraut:
That program does or does not. And so it’s really about evaluating within the context of your own needs and your own goals. Because the reality is is that everybody’s evaluation is going to be different because their needs and their goals are different. And starting with that, a starting point in that evaluation process is really about asking questions and being really mindful of those needs and not being afraid to ask, you know, to challenge when if you’re speaking with vendors or you are considering a different plan is to ask these really important questions. And the biggest ones that I can really stress beyond of course how much, because we do know that budgets are always a concern is really thinking about how can this benefit us and why do we need it? Um, and in what ways will, will we be able to use this effectively?

Dr. Schildkraut:
And these are just important considerations to think about in really evaluating whether or not something is the right fit. And one thing that I would also encourage in that process is really relying on outside resources to help you with those questions. Um, what are the most important resources that any community has is our law enforcement teams. Because in the event of, of course the very worst day, something like a Parkland but also in the course of just, you know, their everyday work and of course schools everyday work is there is a collaboration there that might not get utilized enough. And bringing in law enforcement, you know, and asking them or having them help you with those questions or looking at it from a different perspective is really, really valuable. Because sometimes we get caught in the forest and we don’t see the trees. And so I think it’s really important to rely on them because they’re going to be looking at it from a completely different lens and they may pose questions that we don’t think about.

Dr. Schildkraut: 
Um, or they may see things that present different strategic challenges for them. Um, where they need, where they needed to help respond in any way that schools may or may not be readily aware of. So really about those partnerships is also very important. Seeking out information is equally as important in that process. And this is something that I think is where academia is really beneficial to school districts. Um, usually you have a local university or college, um, where you’ve got departments that are always ready, ready and willing to do research. Um, evaluation research is something a lot of us really thrive on and we really enjoy because it allows us to work hand in hand with our communities. And so I think, you know, in the event that you aren’t finding the evidence that you’re looking for, you aren’t able to evaluate it in the way that you want to is to seek out information and work with other, you know, partners in order to help find that information or to generate it in the event that it’s not readily available.

Dr. Schildkraut:
And that’s where strategic partnerships, like with universities and law enforcement come in really, really handy. And what’s great right now is from that perspective is that there is a lot of funding that is becoming more and more readily available to create these partnerships or to create these synergies in order to establish this evidence. So to give you guys an example, one thing that I’ve spent the last year doing in my, one of our local school districts is looking at the effectiveness of emergency response plans. So of course we know that there are many different iterations of an active shooter Protocol. There’s run high fight avoids and I defend, there’s Alice Code Red. And then of course there’s the standard response protocol from the, I love you guys foundation. And regardless of which one of these you were to pick or that you’re currently using, none of them have any testing behind them to say, you know, this is how they improve effectiveness of students, faculty and staff during lockdowns or this is how it improves feelings or perceptions of preparedness.

Dr. Schildkraut: 
And so for the last year I have partnered with one of our local school districts to be able to answer those questions using the standard response protocol or SRP model and you know, through grants that they had through their insurance company and other partners, they were able to fund this research where we were able to come into a district with 30 schools and be able to test this in multiple layers, which I’ll talk about here a little bit more in a few minutes, but this is where those strategic partnerships can really come into play and be very helpful. And funding is not only available at the local level. We’ve of course seen grant initiatives from our federal government as well. And those strategic partnerships can be really in helping to offset those costs. You know, through the process. One of the thing that’s really important when choosing a solution, whether it’s a product or a protocol or you know, anything of that nature, it’s really about assessment.

Dr. Schildkraut: 
We don’t want to just stick something in a school building and assume that it’s working. So after that plan or product is implemented, it’s really important to assess what the outcome is after the fact. So what types of changes are you seeing after you implement this solution? But at the same time, there’s an important caveat to that and that is you also need to assess before you implement. So the reason why this is really important is because if you didn’t have that before implementation assessment, you cannot adequately address or really understand the change that has taken place. You might say be able to say, well, it looks like things are being done better, or we see this change, but you can’t show a measurable difference. And so this is where before implementation assessment is really important. And so I mentioned that this project that I’ve been working on with our school district looking at this active shooter plan, and so we did this in multiple layers, multiple steps.

Dr. Schildkraut: 
So one of the first things that we did of course is to ask the schools through their principals what they were doing. We wanted to understand what we were coming into, what we were working with. Our very first step in the process after that was to initiate a survey of students, faculty and staff to understand where we were starting from in their perception. So did they view their school is safe? Did they think that there was going to be a shooting at their school? What did they understand about these five different situations that the standard response protocol is going to prepare them for? Um, just sort of what’s their baseline understanding? That was one level of our before implementation assessment. The second level of our before implementation assessment was that we went into the schools and we did an initial lockdown drill. And so that way we had starting information about how many rooms were locked, how many lights were off, how many doors, um, you know, were responded to when we knocked on them and how many people were out of sight like that we couldn’t see or hear them.

Dr. Schildkraut: 
And so in gathering this information, it provided a lot of really important data, not only to us as a group, um, or a research team because we were able to really understand where our starting, you know, baseline was and how we could best help these, you know, these schools. But it also provided schools with valuable information about where their holes were and how they could work internally to close those gaps that we were able to identify. Then what we also did is we repeated those steps. We repeated the lockdown drill and also the survey after we implemented this new emergency response plan through training. And so by comparing the results of the after training drill and surveys chewed the force, training drills and surveys, we could then not only say, look, we think that schools are locking down more effectively. We could show a measurable difference to say here’s how many door more doors were locked after the training than before.

Dr. Schildkraut: 
Or here’s how the perceptions changed after this training as compared to before. So I cannot stress enough that whatever program or plan or protocol or device that you’re planning, you’re thinking about putting into place, always assess beforehand as well as after so that you have a quantitative or a measurable difference that will help you identify whether or not something is or is not going to make a market difference. One thing that’s also really important to kind of be mindful of is that we’re not always going to get it right the first time. And so we may have to add new things in or revise our plan as we go. And I think this becomes all the more important given the technological age that we are currently finding ourselves in. Of course, we know that all different technologies are changing on an everyday basis. And so it’s really important that we’re constantly adapting to these new technologies and these new needs.

Dr. Schildkraut: 
And of course we know that students become more advanced along the way. And they shift in sort of their mindsets. And so our plans also need to shift right along with that. So it’s really important to be mindful of the fact that we’re not only not going to get it right on the first time, but we always have to be able to adapt throughout the process. I like to think of school safety as sort of this living organism or this living document, if you will. Um, our plan is always, ever changing. And so what works for us today may not work for us, you know, at the start of next year or the start of the following year. And so we’re constantly just evolving in that process. And so making sure that we have plan B and sometimes we might even need a plan c or d, it’s okay to make those changes and being mindful of, you know, the fact that it’s okay to say we’re not going to, you know, this didn’t work, but how can we revise work within the confines or make changes in order to, you know, again, address those needs and keep coming back to our goals that we’re trying to achieve in the process.

Dr. Schildkraut:
One thing I also can’t stress enough is that there’s not, as I said, kind of coming back to this idea of a one size fits all solution not existing, we have to have a very layered approach because the reality is is that anything can fail at any given. You know, one thing that I think about when we talk about these one size fits all solutions is that double vestibule, entryways. And of course we know that these are great, you know, really, you know, very good approaches to securing a building they provide. They provide that layered approach in a sense because individuals have to be buzzed in and then buzzed through again. So we’ve added an extra layer security. But when we talk about this layered approach, we also want to be mindful of again, are we achieving our goals? So when we talk about double vestibule entries for, for instance, they’d been brought up in the context a lot of school shootings, but where that conversation has sort of gone astray is the fact that when we’re talking about school shootings are perpetrators are already in the building.

Dr. Schildkraut: 
So how can we layer that double vestibule entry with other things inside of our building in order to achieve those layers? We also want to be really mindful of looking at, again, that bigger picture. So our double vestibule entries are not only being used to keep out school shooters, they keep out lots of people that aren’t supposed to get in our building, especially when they’re paired with visitor management systems like raptor. So being mindful of all of the different layers that we get out of a particular solution, but then also layering that approach to say, right, we don’t have one thing that’s going to work. We need to add layer upon layer so that we’re sort of, you know, filling in any potential holes or gaps that may exist. So I cannot stress enough that you want to layer not only the security products but also layering, you know, with training, with personnel and creating almost a redundant approach so that if any one thing fails, you’ve got a backup plan.

Dr. Schildkraut: 
You’ve got that plan B in place and already ready to go. So some key takeaways as we kind of wrap up here that I just want to really, you know, kind of bring home to you guys is first of all, again, no one size fits all solution is going to exist. So it’s really, really important with whatever you do, whether it’s from a personnel standpoint or a product standpoint, always set those goals, identify your needs, set your goals accordingly and always, constantly come back to the it because that’s what’s going to really drive whether or not something is effective for your needs and for your district and your school buildings again, because it’s not going to be effective for everybody. Find your best fit and that’s going to look very different to everybody. Um, I constantly think about, you know, in my own university, which is about 8,000 people, how that compares to where I went to college, where, um, I actually went to the University of central Florida, which is now the largest school in the nation with 65,000 people.

Dr. Schildkraut: 
So very different needs. Find your fit and make sure that whatever you’re putting in actually does fit implementing always with an evaluation plan. And that evaluation plan may involve bringing in outside partners to help with that evaluation. But always being mindful of we can’t just put it into place and assume that it’s going to work. We want to make sure that it’s gonna work and if it’s not, then how do we change that? Always be assessing and reassessing. Even if you find in the course of your evaluation that something is working. Again, what works today may not work for you tomorrow may not work for you down the road. So it’s a constant process that we’re co we always want to be revisited. And in that mindset, something that somebody told me when I became a first time homeowner is you have to be able to improvise, adapt, and or overcome.

Dr. Schildkraut: 
So if you put a solution into place and it’s not working out the way that you had anticipated, think about improvising. Is there a way we can make a change within the current context to make this work better for us? If not, can we change this current process that we have to make it more effective? And in the absolute worst case scenario where you can’t improvise or adapt, maybe you have to overcome and put in a new solution. And that’s okay. As long as, again, we’re just being really mindful of that constant evaluation plan and making sure that we always come back to the idea of layering and finding our best fit within our needs. So I do want to thank everybody so much for your time today. I know we’re going to get to questions and answers here in a few moments, but before we do, I want to go ahead and transition over to Clayton Dorsett who is the regional director for raptor technologies. We’ll talk to you a bit more about the solutions available. Okay.

Clayton Dorsett:
All right. Thank you Dr Schildkraut for sharing very valuable Information with our audience here today. A welcome everybody. My name is Clayton Dorsette. I am the regional director here with raptor technologies. I’m going to go over a quick overview of one of our products today or emergency management. Uh, but before we get started, just as a quick reminder, doctor, Schildkraut and I will have a Q and a at the end of this. So feel free to put any questions you have in the chat and we’ll be sure to get to those here at the end. So with that said, again, my name is Clayton Dorsett.

Clayton Dorsett: 
I’m with raptor. Uh, as you can see here on the screen today, we helped protect over 28,000 k 12 schools across the country using our security products today. A couple, a couple of those products that we do offer, uh, is our visitor management system. We have our volunteer management and our emergency management. So for the visitor management, what we do is we basically turn your paper and Pencil sign in sheet that you use to manage everyone coming in and out of your schools and to an electronic visitor management. And it does a lot of things for you. But what we’re most known for is the fact that we can do two instant checks on your visitors, your contractors, your volunteers, etcetera. The first is an instant sex offender check. Today we flag about 40 registered sex offenders every single day attempting to enter our client’s schools.

Clayton Dorsett: 
And the second instance check that we do is against the custom database where district or school can put whatever they want to be flagged. Most schools put in custody issues to help them keep track of who can pick up whom and we issue about a hundred of those customer alerts every single day. That’s our main visitor management product, so we also have a full lifecycle volunteer management product that also does those instant screens on your volunteers coming in and out, but it actually covers the whole life cycle. Everything from an online volunteer application through to a full criminal background screening on that volunteer through to signing them in into the school, tracking their hours, running reports, also specific volunteers, total hours, events, top volunteers, et cetera. So again, the full life cycle of volunteer management. The third product that we have that we’re going to talk about today is our raptor emergency management and that’s comprised of three components, the drill management, active incident management and parents student reunification.

Clayton Dorsett: 
Yeah. Now for drill management will we allow you guys to do is electronically build out your drill schedule for all your a campuses within the district. You can go ahead, set up those with drill requirements, published that drill schedule so your school sites will be able to go in there and begin to plan complete those drills. And the Nice thing about this is you guys at the district level, we’ll have a nice compliance dashboard to see which campuses have completed, which ones are out of compliance and which school sites have planned those drills required. So again, this is our electronic drill management. Our second product that we’re going to go over is our active incident management. So again, we partnered with the, I love you guys foundation and our emergency management firm aligns 100% with the SRP and the SRM and it really can be aligned to any protocol your district uses.

Clayton Dorsett: 
So for here, our active incident management, we have a couple off site locations that we’re looking for there at the reunification, which does that Meridian, Saint Thomas and those recreational center. So let’s go and have an incident in the can. So in this case, we’re going to initiate a lockdown at Eisenhower Elementary. So at this point, what we’re doing is we’re bringing in 21st century technology into the emergency management space. And so what the SRO in this case is going to be our incident commander and each campus can have a their own type of incident commander. It can be a principal, assistant principal. In this case we do have the SRO. Well if they’re going to do is open up the Raptor application, initiate that emergency incident. And again, we’re going to say it’s a lockdown at Eisenhower Elementary. So once this has been initiated, alerts are now being sent out to all of the buildings.

Clayton Dorsett: 
Yeah. And this is really the compliment. Anything you guys would do today through the PA system or whatever it may be. So again, we instantly send those messages. Now let’s take a look inside the classroom. Well, we see here is once the teacher receives that automated message, typically what happens is you turn off the lights, lock the door, and hide in the corner. So now at this point, what the teacher is able to do is open up the rafter application on their phone. We automatically sync with your sis system to pull the class schedule in real time. So the first thing the teacher will do is account for themselves and what location they’re in. At this point we’re going to pull that student at roster and they can begin updating the statuses in real time. Okay. On these predetermined categories. So what’s gonna happen now is once all the students that have been updated, this is happening simultaneously.

Clayton Dorsett:
Okay. Throughout the building at the same exact time. Okay. So now you guys, outside of this campus as the on the district emergency team, we’ll have a nice clean desk board of all the statuses that have been updated in real time. Who’s the mark injured accounted for. And in this case we can see the four students were marked injured inside the campus. So we can drill down into that. The Ginny Anthony was marked, we can drill down into her profile and see who marked her where she’s located. And we’re also able to pull the Guardian information directly from her sis in case you need to make a quick phone call, text or email. Okay. So that’s our active incident management. It gives you guys that visibility into the school that you may not have today. So now let’s talk about the reunification at the offsite location. So again, this is where we follow the SRP. Yeah. And we’re going to say we’re going to go with plan a, I’m reading elementary for our reunification site. So the first thing you want to do is you want to have it set up. Okay. And here we’re going to have a student holding area.

Clayton Dorsett: 
We’re going to have a guardian greeter area and we’re going to have a re unifier desk. So at this point, what’s going to happen as students are going to begin to arrive to the student holding area. Now this is where you’re going to use your mass notification system in order to notify the parents of the reunification instructions. Okay? Okay. So at that point, once those instructions go out, pants are going to begin to show up. Their first port touch is going to be at the Guardian greeter death. So the Guardian greeter you can see is working out of the greeter tab. All their role is, it’s going to be simply to start doing vacation process with each student. So they’re going to search for Theodore, they’re going to pull the approved guardians as well. So we’re going to be able to initiate that. It is Ms. Atkins and we’re going to go ahead and verify and you can see the reunification has been initiated.

Clayton Dorsett: 
So that same step is going to happen at every single time as the parent comes in for the Guardian-Greeter. Now here at the reunify her desk, you’re going to have your runner. The runners is going to be working out of the runner tab and what they’re going to do is hit retrieve next student. That student’s going to automatically populate and see that it’s Theodore. So what they’re going to do now is they’re going to go to the student holding area to grab Theodore. Theodore is gonna come back to the re fire desk here. You’re going to have the reunifier. And it’s gonna see that Theodore is in route. So at this point they’re going to call miss actives up to the front. The runner’s gonna arrive with Theodore.

Clayton Dorsett: 
At this point we can also present some form of Guardian items, vacations to verify we’re going to hit reunify. You can have the parent guardian, sign out. And then a full reunification summary is offices. And the Nice thing about the system too is upon completion an automated messages sent out to all the designated guardians. So that way you don’t have multiple parents coming in asking where their kid is. Again, we could send out a quick message, let them know that Theodore has been reunified with Ms. Atkins at this point. They go happily ever after. And so what we have found with Brighton area schools is we’re able to reunify students with their loved ones four times faster than the paper and pencil method with using this procedure that you see here today. Okay. So with that said, I’m going to go ahead and pass it back over to Shannon so we can begin the Q and. A.

S. Gonzalez: 
Thank you so much. Clayton. Um, just a reminder, if you do have questions, please put them in the box and we will include them in this session. And if we don’t get to your question today and we will follow up with you right after today’s Webinar. Clayton, the first question is for you, does raptor integrate with SIS systems? And um, we do have a specific question about from the audience on how does it integrate with power school?

Clayton Dorsett: 
That’s a great question. So today what we do is, uh, we leveraged clever

S. Gonzalez: 
and will through clever. We’re able to think with your SIS. That’s something that will help you out with on the onboarding process,

Clayton Dorsett:
but it is synced through clever in real time. Okay.

S. Gonzalez:
Thank you so much Kate. This next question is for Dr. Schildkraut. Dr. Schildkraut during your presentation when you were talking about strategic partnership, you reference, funding that is available? How can districts find out more about any grants or funding that would be available to support their school safety initiatives?

Dr. Schildkraut: 
You know, that’s a great question. Um, one thing that I personally do is I’m signed up to receive,, emails from different organizations like the National Institute of Justice. Um, the Arnold Foundation who recently put out some, some funding in terms of, uh, grants for gun violence research. So, you know, kind of seeing what’s available out there. If you’re working with a strategic partner like a university, they often have a grants office specifically that can help to identify different avenues of funding. Um, but as I said with my particular project that I’ve most recently worked on, uh, the district actually had their own funding sources, so that worked out really well. Um, but also never be afraid to talk to your local legislators. Um, cause you know, they certainly got a vested interest in helping to ensure, uh, you know, that their district in their constituents are safe. And so another project that I’m getting ready to work on is, uh, with a different county. It would be actually implementing the standard response protocol county wide. And their legislature has actually taken on the heavy lift of applying for grants through the cops office, the community oriented policing services office. Um, and also pulling funding out of the community itself. So various avenues. Um, that’s, but again, that’s where a strategic partner can be really helpful.

S. Gonzalez:
Great. Thank you so much. Next question for you is how much is the raptor emergency management then as well as the visitor management system? Today you could purchase if you bundled it to the visitor management system to get up and running per site. $1725. So $1700, $25. Uh, but starting year two it drops down to $540 annually per site. And then with our emergency management, if you bundled the two, it would be $760 per site annually.

S. Gonzalez: 
Thank you Clayton. Question for Dr. Schildkraut. You mentioned that you work, you have worked with children. How, how do you talk to children about school safety and specifically, this personally would like to know how do you ensure that they are taking drills seriously?

Dr. Schildkraut: 
Those are excellent questions. Um, you know, first of all, the first part, I think that from what I’ve found over the last year, the apprehension about, you know, these, the, the current climate in schools is actually more among adults than it is among the kids. And I say that because, um, you know, for me personally, I graduated high school the year before Columbine happened, so I never went through an active shooter drill while I was a student. And I think, you know, with kids today, they’ve never known a world that didn’t have something like active shooter drills. So I think for adults it’s a change, a shift in thinking or a shift in experiences where as for kids, it’s just what they’ve always known. And so, you know, I think you can have very candid conversations with them. Um, you know, certainly obviously age appropriate, but kids today think about this stuff.

Dr. Schildkraut:
Um, you know, when I spent time in schools, they were thinking about what if somebody climbs through an air vent or can we have a ladder or, you know, what are the different things that we can do? And so I think they do take it seriously. But I think, you know, what I also kind of observed is I think because of the apprehension among the adults, we’re not giving kids enough credit unfortunately that they do or they have been brought up in this world. Um, as far as you know, taking things like drills seriously, one thing that I definitely recommend is not put, not publicizing when drills are going to be, um, it should never be on school calendars. Um, not to say that you should come in row with, you know, simunition and police officers and everything like that. Um, but you should have, each school should have a core drill team and that should be really the only people that know that the drill is going to happen.

Dr. Schildkraut: 
Obviously other than the principal and administrators. And when we make the drill call, we actually don’t lead off with this as a drill because if that’s the first thing that people hear, then they tend to tune it out. So, for instance, with the language of Standard Response Protocol, which is locked down, locks, lights out of sight, our drill call would be locked down, locks, lights out of sight. This is a drill locked down, locks, lights out of sight. So we’re reducing that apprehension or that tension in terms of them thinking it’s real because we’ve identified that it’s a drill, but we’re also adding a layer of seriousness by making sure that the first thing that they’re hearing is locked down. And I think that’s been a very useful approach for us. It might not, again be an approach that works for everybody, but we have found success with that.

Clayton Dorsett:
Thank you so much. Dr. Schildkraut. Last question here is for Clayton. Dr. Schildkraut mentioned in her presentation that it’s important to have a layered approach. Can you talk about what are the benefits, um, of, of a partner of the district using both director visitor management system and the emergency management system as well? Yeah, that’s a great question. And they cover two aspects. And the cool thing about the two systems as well is I do have a full integration within the two. So your full visitor list, will also be present in the emergency management applications, so your visitors and contractors or whoever else is on the campus can also be accounted for through the application, and again, the visitor management covers more of the front end of the school and makes sure that that individual is allowed to be there. And then the emergency management is again for those, uh, for those lock downs, lockouts whatever they may be. And really to help streamline that process, move it away from pen

S. Gonzalez:
and paper to a more quicker and seamless transition. Thank you again Dr. Schildkraut for joining us today. We really appreciate all the information that you shared contacting information for both Raptor and Dr. Schildkraut is on the screen now. We do have upcoming webinars. Ah, and to register, please visit raptortech.com/register also you will receive an email survey shortly. If you could give us some feedback, we would greatly appreciate it, so we can take your input into account as we plan for additional webinars topics in the future. This does conclude our broadcast today. Thank you so much for joining us and we hope to see you on the next webinar. Have a great day.

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